Fish Meds? – Really

Before reading this blog, please understand a few things:

– I am not a doctor, nurse, EMT, shaman, or any other medical professional (basically I have no real idea of what I’m talking about.)
– Take the following as educational or informational, not advice or recommended practices.
– I am not responsable for anything that happens because, for whatever stupid reason, you base your decision to use “Fish Meds” on this blog posting; seek real medical advice if you need help.
– Only consider using “Fish Meds” if you have no other choice, the only other option is death, and you are accepting full responsibility for the side effects. (There are some who claim that side effects, including blindness, death, and itchy rashes increase when using generic versions of antibiotics, how much more will they increase when designed for something with gills?)

Interesting Video On The Topic

Where To Get Fish Meds?
AMAZON! (There are other places, but that is where I got mine) prices seem to be best on the net, and they have a good selection. There are other pet-meds supply stores that are available as other options, but I’m only listing the Amazon option.

Some Things To Think About
– Look at the total amount in the bottle, as well as the mg of each pill to figure out the best price.
– Print out instructions/guidelines and put them in a plastic bag, put this bag in a plastic bag with the meds. Put all these figgin’ bags in the freezer for long-term storage.

Amoxicillin

Certain types of bacterial infections can be treated with amoxicillin. Uses of the antibiotic include the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections, ear infections, strep throat, and gonorrhea. The medication is approved for use in both adults and children (including very young children). Some healthcare providers may also occasionally recommend off-label uses of amoxicillin, such as for preventing infections instead of treating them.

Not all bacteria will respond to amoxicillin. Also, bacteria have different resistance patterns in different regions in the country. This means that some bacteria may be susceptible to amoxicillin in certain parts of the country but not in others. Amoxicillin is completely ineffective for treating viral illnesses (such as the common cold or the flu).

Do not use if you are allergic to amoxicillin or to any other penicillin antibiotic, such as ampicillin (Omnipen, Principen), dicloxacillin (Dycill, Dynapen), oxacillin (Bactocill), penicillin (Beepen-VK, Ledercillin VK, Pen-V, Pen-Vee K, Pfizerpen, V-Cillin K, Veetids), and others.

There is no “standard” amoxicillin dose that is recommended for all situations. Your healthcare provider will calculate the appropriate dose taking into account several factors, including your weight, the severity of the infection, the type of the infection, and the type of bacteria causing the infection.

HERE is a good list for use, I would suggest printing it and putting it in with the meds.

Amazon Link – One of many choices.
eMeds Info – This is where I found most of the above info, there is additional information as well.

Ciprofloxacin

Several bacterial infections can be treated with ciprofloxacin, such as bladder infections, pneumonia, and sinus infections. Off-label uses for ciprofloxacin include treating other types of infections caused by susceptible bacteria. This drug is not appropriate for all bacterial infections, and it will not treat viral infections. Children can use many of the ciprofloxacin products; however, they may have an increased risk for tendon problems.

Ciprofloxacin will not work to cure infections caused by viruses, such as the common cold, the flu, or viral conjunctivitis.

For Ciprofloxacin tablets, the usual dosage is between 250 mg and 750 mg every 12 hours, depending on the type of infection.

The length of treatment will very, depending on the type and severity of the infection. It may be as short as a single dose for treating certain gonorrhea infections or as long as the recommended 60 days for the treatment of anthrax exposure. Most people will likely take ciprofloxacin for 7 to 14 days.

Here is a screen shot from drugs.com (direct link to full-page) on dosage.

For questions on medical abbreviations: Wiki-page (q means every)

Amazon Link – One of many choices.
eMeds Info – This is where I found most of the above info, there is additional information as well.

Doxycycline

Common doxycycline uses include the treatment of acne, bacterial infections, anthrax infections, and the prevention of malaria. Doxycycline should not be used in children under the age of 8, because permanent discoloration and altered development of teeth may occur. Off-label doxycycline uses include the treatment of infections that are resistant to another antibiotic known as vancomycin.

The recommended doxycycline dosage for most types of bacterial infections in adults is 100 mg to 200 mg per day for 7 to 14 days. For chronic (long-term) or more serious infections, treatment can be carried out for a longer time.

In children ages eight or older, your healthcare provider will prescribe a doxycycline dosage based on a weight chart, usually about 1 to 2 mg per pound of body weight per day. The dose is divided and taken for 7 to 14 days. Children should generally be limited to 200 mg or less of doxycycline per day.

HERE is a good list of dosage instructions from Drugs.com

The recommended dose of doxycycline for preventing malaria is 100 mg daily for adults. For children, the dosage is 2 mg per kilogram of body weight (about 0.9 mg per pound), not to exceed 100 mg per day. Treatment should begin a day or two prior to travel, be taken with you throughout your stay in the area of concern, and continued for 28 days after you have left the noted area. Usage should not exceed four months.

Amazon Link – One of many choices.
eMeds Info – This is where I found most of the above info, there is additional information as well.

Azithromycin (AKA Zithromax)

Azithromycin is used to treat a number of common bacterial infections in both children and adults. Ear, skin, and respiratory infections are among the infections that azithromycin treats. The medicine is also used to treat some sexually transmitted diseases, including gonorrhea and chlamydia. Off-label azithromycin uses include preventing heart infections and treating acne.

Azithromycin is not effective against any infection caused by a virus, such as the flu, stomach flu, or common cold.

The recommended dosage for most types of common bacterial infections is 250 mg or 500 mg once daily for three to five days. For chronic or more serious infections, your healthcare provider may continue azithromycin treatment for an extended period of time.

In children, the dosing can range (depending on body weight) from 5 mg to 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day (mg/kg/day), once daily for three to five days.

HERE is a good list of dosage instructions from Drugs.com

Amazon Link – One of many choices.
eMeds Info – This is where I found most of the above info, there is additional information as well.

The above is a good starting point and selection of Fish Meds that are available. Please do your research and consult a prepper friendly doctor before using.

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2 Responses to Fish Meds? – Really

  1. rick says:

    I have enjoyed your stories, first girl, then now boy. What I like the most abut them is realism you bring to the writing. Almost like you go out on the weekend and actually do the stuff you write about in the next chapter. Very real and probable much like Survivoman. I hate stories that go all Bear Grillis, their are just too fake.

    Anyway about the fish meds. I am not a doctor, but I do have a lot of practical medical experience. I take them as needed, and have been for years. I trust them enough to give to my family as needed. They are an excellent product and anyone would be very smart to include the 5 antibiotics that are currently available in their preps. Stock up, they are cheap, and would be worth their weight in gold in a crisis.

    • Rick: Thanks for your comment!

      Regarding my stories: I do test some of what I write, obviously I don’t have a real TEOTWAWKI environment to work out all the details, but I take my preps seriously and do what I can to prove some concepts.

      Regarding The Meds: Thanks for your input on your experiences with them, I agree that in a crisis they will we worth their weight in gold – if not more!

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